Peanuts – They are everywhere

Unshelled peanuts

Peanut – an essential ingredient worldwide

https://feastingnotfasting.com/african-peanut-soup/

African peanut soup

Peanut allergic traveler alert. There is a global infusion of peanut used as an ingredient in many countries such as; Guatemala, Mexico, Spain, Israel, France, China, Thailand, Indonesia and African countries such as Ghana, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Mali and Senegal.

I am not trying to increase your blood pressure.  But it is important to read about cultural cuisine in order to avoid, avoid, avoid.

Soups, sauces, breads, cookies, and pastes Oh my!

https://www.africanbites.com/african-peanut-stew/

popsugar.com

Phad Thai

http://muybuenocookbook.com/2011/03/capirotada-mexican-bread-pudding/

Capirotada, Mexican bread pudding

The Chinese boil peanuts.   The familiar ‘Phad Thai’, a Thailand dish is served in Thai restaurants worldwide.  Peanut sauce is common in Indonesia.  The list goes on and on and on.

Peanuts are global.  Be careful!

Because of their global presence it is necessary for people with peanut allergies to be cautious.  Ask about ingredients where ever you travel.

Read labels; they will list peanut as an ingredient or a disclaimer due to cross contact.  Most cereals abroad have a disclaimer stating possible traces of peanut.  Most European and Northern African labeling has many languages listing ingredients including English.

On street corners – In markets, buckets and wheel barrows

Bulk peanut sales are a common international food commodity sold in stands, on roadsides, sidewalks and grocery stores.

allthingskenyon.com

Kenyan woman selling peanuts on the roadside.

Speak peanut

Peanut translations for you to get to know;

Spanish – Maní (ma -knee) or Cacahuete  (kaka – who- ay – tey)

French – Arachide  (ah – rha – she – day) (gutteral rha, less emphasis on the ‘day’) and cacahuète

Arabic – – الفول السوداني  or  alfawl alsudaniu  (all – fall  alsoo – dany – yoo)

Thai – ถั่วลิสง  T̄hạ̀w lis̄ng (something like: thew lees-ong)

Indonesian – kacang (ka – chāng)

The word ‘No‘ is universal; bring chef cards and of course,  epinephrine is a must.

Au revoir, chau, and wadaeaaan,

Julie

If you are traveling and have questions about food allergy management please send an email: juliet@allergyfreetable.com

 

Julie, founder of Allergy Free Table, LLC, and her family spend their time exploring, traveling and learning how to eat healthy without allergens or food sensitivities. She has worn many hats in the food allergy community since 2001 - support group member, volunteer, advocate, educator, author and speaker. Julie received her master's degree from Framingham State University in Nutrition Education in 2015.

Posted in Food Allergies, Peanut, Shopping advice, Travel